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Barming Primary School

Be Kind, Be Safe, Be Responsible And Make Good Choices

Barming Primary School

Be Kind, Be Safe, Be Responsible And Make Good Choices

Christmas is coming - EYFS Wednesday 7th December 2022 9.30am and 2pm and KS1 Friday 9th December 2022 9.30am and 2pm :-) Please ensure you have booked tickets!
Welcome to BarmingPrimary School
Barming Primary School is a 2 form entry primary school on the outskirts of Maidstone. It is a co-educational school for children aged 2 to 11 years old. There are currently 416 children on roll.
A Message from the Headteacher
Barming Primary School has so much to offer. Everyone is welcome and children are encouraged to flourish and achieve their goals. Come and find out what we are all about!
Orchard Academy Trust
Barming Primary School is an Academy and is part of the Orchard Trust family of schools. The Trust currently consists of Allington Primary School and Barming Primary School.

Last Week's Attendance:

  • Reception 94.9%
  • Year 1 94.9%
  • Year 2 95.6%
  • Year 3 89.5%
  • Year 4 95.8%
  • Year 5 95.3%
  • Year 6 95.5%
  • Whole School - 94.4%

Maths

“Mathematics can be terrific fun; knowing that you can enjoy it is psychologically and intellectually empowering.” (Watson, 2006)

 

Mathematics Vision at Barming Primary School:

 

At Barming, we want all children, no matter what ability, to enjoy learning Maths, to make links between Maths and other subjects, to be challenged and to be able to apply their mathematical knowledge to real life situations. We will strive to ensure that all children enjoy, achieve and succeed during their time with us.

Maths

Intent

 

At Barming Primary School we follow the ‘Focus Maths Scheme’.   Focus Maths has been designed to support teachers with the delivery of the Primary Mathematics Curriculum.   The materials within Focus Maths help teachers to plan and deliver Mathematics teaching and learning in a way which is challenging and aligned with end of year curricular expectations.   Focus Maths breaks down the Mathematics Curriculum so that teachers can plan for units of work in a manageable way.   The structure for each year group is identical.  

 

The focus Maths Scheme is…

  1. A guide to help teachers and leaders structure progressive learning in Mathematics.  
  2. A breakdown of the Mathematics Curriculum.  
  3. An approach embedded in reaching end of year expectations and deepening Mathematics learning.
  4. A structured approach to support teachers with planning exciting Mathematics learning.

 

The Focus Maths Scheme is not a prescriptive guide of how to teach Mathematics.

 

We chose Focus Maths, after using the ‘White Rose Hub’ for a period of time, as we needed a scheme that was based around a spiralling curriculum.   The majority of children at Barming Primary School learn best through repetition and coming back, regularly, to key concepts throughout the year.

 

The Focus Maths Scheme provides examples of questions to be taught, but does not provide a full lessons worth of activities as the Class Teacher needs to ensure the curriculum is adapted for the needs of their class.   By having a scheme that is heavily prescriptive means that teachers tend to stick to it rigidly.   At Barming Primary School, we do not feel this is good practice as ‘one size, does not fit all’.   Therefore, teachers are supplied with the lesson overview, but they are required to find resources that fully develop the individual child’s knowledge and understanding of Mathematical concepts.

 

Each term has been designed with 12 blocks.   It is acknowledged that the actual school year is slightly longer and this allows teachers flexibility to revisit and extend teaching blocks as required.  

 

Planning Vs Preparation

 

  • One of the unique features of Focus Maths is that it potentially does the planning for the teacher, releasing them to focus on preparation.  
  • In this way more time and thought can be afforded to where the starting points are for pupils and ensuring adaptation is efficient and effective.  
  • Concepts like ‘pre-teaching’ and ‘pre-learning’ can be thought-through enabling intervention to be of maximum effectiveness.
  • What you can be confident about is that Focus Maths provides you with comprehensive coverage of each National Curriculum year.
  • It provides teachers with just enough guidance but leaves them very much in charge of the delivery.
  • Formative assessment has been built in allowing teaching and assessment to have an even greater impact on day-to-day learning.
  • Each school needs to decide whether each unit covers the planning that is required by senior leaders but school’s need to be aware of making planning efficient and not to get teachers to copy chunks of the units into a pre-prepared school format when the unit as a whole could be adopted as the planning format

 

Implementation

 

The Focus Education Scheme sets out a clear structure to the teaching activities which is set out as follows:

 

  1. Pre-learning task
  2. Practice and consolidation
  3. Deepening understanding
  4. Working at greater depth
  5. Pupil and teacher assessment

 

Pre-learning task:

 

For each construct a pre-learning task is provided.   The pre-learning task has been designed to help assess whether children are in a place to access learning aligned with the end of year expectations.   These are not intended to be used with every child for every unit of work.   Teachers should use based on professional judgement from ongoing teacher assessment.   The pre-learning tasks can be especially useful when embarking on a new area of learning or with a child new to the class.

 

Practice and consolidation:

 

The teaching ideas on these pages are designed to support learning pitched against the end of year expectations.   There may be pupils who can ‘leap frog’ this stage of learning as the teacher assesses they are already secure with the end of year expectation.   In every example, there are ideas for mental and oral rehearsal alongside concrete (pencil and paper) activities.   At this stage of learning, pupils will be usually supported by the teacher and guided through the mathematics content in a scaffolded way.   The removal of scaffolding will help teachers assess the level of independence when undertaking learning aligned with end of year expectations.

 

Deepening understanding:

 

The teaching ideas on these pages take learning beyond evidence of attaining the end of year expectation into evidence of deeper understanding of the mathematical construct, giving particular attention to reasoning and thinking.   The examples are not exhaustive but rather suggestions for teachers when probing deeper understanding.   On the other hand it could be used as a formative assessment tool.

 

Working at greater depth:

 

The ideas on these pages are intended to support teachers in designing mathematical learning tasks which enable pupils to work at a ‘deeper’ level.   Note that these are all designed to deepen understanding of the end of year expectation rather than move pupils on to learning from subsequent years.   A range of different kinds of activity are included throughout to provide variety and opportunity to assess learning in different ways.

 

Pupil and teacher assessment:

 

These pages are intended to be used by pupils and teachers to assess current learning against the end of year expectation.   For each expectation, the learning steps are listed (bottom to top) in child appropriate language.   These can usefully be used as a ‘before and after’ assessment to demonstrate progress.

 

Activities and Resources:

 

Teachers are encouraged to find/produce meaningful activities and adapt them accordingly for their class, so that they are closely linked to the concept being taught.   Teachers are also encouraged to find a range of activities from a range of sources, as we feel it is important for the children to see mathematical questions presented in a variety of ways – this further helps to assess their using and applying skills and the decoding of mathematical problems.

 

Impact

 

Throughout the year the children are assessed in numerous ways:

  1. Termly teacher assessments against the coverage of Focus Maths and End of Year Expectations.
  2. Pupil voice
  3. Book looks
  4. Termly multiplication tests:

 

Times Tables at Barming Primary School

 

  • In KS1 Mathematics lessons are held on a daily basis and last for approximately 50 minutes including a 5 minute starter activity every day.
  • In KS2 the daily Mathematics lesson lasts for approximately 60 minutes including a 5 minute starter activity every day.
  • Every Monday each year group will focus on the following within the starter activity:


Whole School Approach Progression Map

 

 

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

Term 4

Term 5

Term 6

Reception

Unitizing

Equal and unequal groups

Estimate and count a quantity of objects to 20.

Year 1

Unitizing

Equal and unequal groups

1x

2x

5x

10x (5x)

Year 2

(1x) 2x

5x

(5x) 10x

3x

0x and revision

Revision of 1s, 2s, 3s, 5s, 10s and 0s

Year 3

(2x) 4x

(4x) 8x

3x

(3x) 6x

(6x) 12x

Revision of 0s, 1s, 2s, 3s, 4s, 5s, 6s, 8s, 10s and 12s

Year 4

(3x) 9x

7x

(1x) 11x

(4x) 8x

Revision of all times tables

Multiplication Check (June)

Year 5

Assessment of times tables knowledge for gap analysis

Revision of times tables from term 1 assessment

Revision of times tables from term 1 assessment

Squares

In school assessment for gap analysis

Revision of times tables from term 5 assessment

Year 6

Assessment of times tables knowledge for gap analysis

Revision of times tables from term 1 assessment

Revision of times tables from term 1 assessment

Revision of all times tables including squares

SATs

Times tables games

 

 

5.Tests are planned and are carried out during the academic year, please see table below for schedule:

 

 

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

Term 4

Term 5

Term 6

Year R

Reception Baseline Assessments

 

 

 

 

 

Year 1

 

 

 

 

 

NTS Maths (only if at expected standard).

Year 2

 

Past Practice SATs Papers.

 

Past Practice SATs Papers.

SATs

 

Year 3

 

NTS Maths.

 

NTS Maths.

 

NTS Maths.

Year 4

 

NTS Maths.

 

NTS Maths.

 

NTS Maths.

Multiplications Tests.

Year 5

 

NTS Maths.

 

NTS Maths.

 

NTS Maths.

Year 6

 

Past Practice SATs Papers.

Past Practice SATs Papers.

Past Practice SATs Papers.

SATs

 

 

Maths leader to then analyse data termly in order to identify any additional support needed, either individually, year groups or Key Stages.

What happens in our Maths lessons?

 

At Barming Primary School, ‘mastery approaches’ to teaching Maths are used to ensure deep, long-term, secure and adaptable understanding of the subject. We believe that mastery of Maths is a tool for life and teachers reinforce an expectation that all pupils are capable of achieving high standards in Mathematics. The focus is on the development of deep structural knowledge and the ability to make connections. Making connections in Mathematics deepens knowledge of concepts and procedures, ensures what is learnt is sustained over time, and cuts down the time required to assimilate and master later concepts and techniques. 

 

Our pupils are taught in small, carefully sequenced steps that must be mastered before they move to the next stage. Teachers are clear that their role is to teach in a precise way which makes it possible for all pupils to engage successfully with tasks at the expected level of challenge. Concepts are often explored together to make mathematical relationships explicit and strengthen pupils’ understanding of mathematical connectivity. Precise questioning during lessons ensures that our pupils develop fluent technical proficiency and think deeply about the underpinning mathematical concepts. There is no prioritisation between technical proficiency and conceptual understanding; in our classrooms these two key aspects of mathematical learning are developed in parallel.

Taking our Maths learning outside!

 

Maths doesn't have to be dull or confined to indoors. The outdoor area often offers opportunities for children to explore mark making in ways that are less threatening and more appealing than indoors. Consider chalks on paving slabs, water and brushes, sticks, pebbles and even mud! These methods offer purpose and can attract children who avoid pencil and paper activities.

 

At Barming Primary School, we pride ourselves in planning for creative learning opportunities and ways to get children using their mathematical skills in the fresh air amongst nature.

 

The following photographs show: Maths learning outside and how links can be made to the Autumn season. Children drew manipulatives on the playground with chalks, completed treasure hunts to support times tables learning and used natural resources to demonstrate their understanding.

The Curriculum:

 

The National Curriculum for Mathematics (2014) aims for pupils to:

  • become fluent in the fundamentals of Mathematics, including through varied and frequent practice with increasingly complex problems over time, so that pupils have conceptual understanding and are able to recall and apply their knowledge rapidly and accurately to problems.
  • reason Mathematically by following a line of enquiry, conjecturing relationships and generalisations, and developing an argument, justification or proof using Mathematical language.
  •  solve problems by applying their Mathematics to a variety of routine and non-routine problems with increasing sophistication, including breaking down problems into a series of simpler steps and persevering in seeking solutions. 

Our Maths Leader is Mrs L Robinson 

 

“Without Mathematics, there’s nothing you can do. Everything around you is mathematics. Everything around you is numbers.”  Shakuntala Devi.

NSPCC Number Day

We use lots of resources when working in Maths to show our understanding in different ways.

Fundamental Idea

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Dr Yeap talks about one of the fundamental ideas in mathematics: that items can only be counted, added, and subtracted if they have the same nouns. He uses a simple example with concrete objects, chocolates and glue sticks to illustrate the point and then shows how it relates to column addition and the addition of fractions.

Number Bonds

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Dr. Yeap explains how young children can use concrete materials and later use pictorial representations as number bonds. Number bonds represent how numbers can be split up into their component parts. Children can explore number bonds using a variety of concrete materials, such as counters with containers and ten frames or with symbols.

Subtraction

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Dr. Yeap explains how standard column subtraction can be taught meaningfully by using children's knowledge of number bonds. Once children can explain how numbers can be split into their component parts, they can adapt their understanding to the conventional column subtraction method.

Mental Calculations

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Dr. Yeap discusses how children can develop an ability to calculate the four operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication and division) in their heads without the use of paper and pencil or calculators.

Multiplication

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Dr. Yeap discusses how children can learn their times tables meaningfully by using visualisation and other strategies.

Long Division

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Dr Yeap discusses how children can learn to do long division meaningfully by first using concrete apparatus, such as base-10 materials, to perform the operations. They can then explore how this idea is represented in the long division algorithm.

Bar Model

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Dr. Yeap discusses how diagrams can be used to represent a situation in a problem: such as rectangles representing (unknown) quantities. This method of visualising problems is known as the bar model.
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