Menu
Home Page

Barming Primary School

Be Kind, Be Safe, Be Responsible And Make Good Choices

Barming Primary School

Be Kind, Be Safe, Be Responsible And Make Good Choices

Animal Agents Summer Reading Challenge 2017 - We came 6th... Well done everyone who took part!
Welcome to BarmingPrimary School
Barming Primary School is a 2 form entry primary school on the outskirts of Maidstone. It is a co-educational school for children aged 4 to 11 years old. There are currently 403 children on role.
A Message from the Head of School
Barming Primary School has so much to offer. Everyone is welcome and children are encouraged to flourish and achieve their goals. Come and find out what we are all about!
Orchard Academy Trust
Barming Primary School is an Academy and is part of the Orchard Trust family of schools. The Trust currently consists of Allington Primary School and Barming Primary School.

Last Week's Attendance:

  • Reception 79.0%
  • Year 1 98.1%
  • Year 2 96.8%
  • Year 3 98.4%
  • Year 4 98.9%
  • Year 5 95.8%
  • Year 6 99.2%
  • Whole School - 97.2%

DIGITAL SAFETY

 

Do you know what your children are looking at online?

Are you aware of how old you should be to use Facebook? Snapchat? Whatsapp?

Do you have security settings at home on your computer?

 

Click here for support and advice for parents.

 

Digital Parenting Magazine - This is an online safety guide for parents with weekly newsletters to keep you up-to-date with how to keep your family safe online.

 

Click here to see the advice we are giving your children!

Click here to view useful links to organisations who provide advice to parents/carers.
  • Click here for articles from Parent Info on how your children can stay safe online.

Cybersense – a New App for Parents/Carers from Internet Matters

CyberSense is Intern Matters’ new app designed to help parents and carers talk about online safety issues with their children to ensure that they make smart choices to stay safe online.

cybersense-w640

The app is aimed at children aged between 8-10 to help them think about what they would do if they were faced with different situations online; from cyberbullying to sharing content with someone they don’t know.

The App includes a quiz that is played on a tablet with a split screen. This is mainly to encourage parents/carers and children to answer the questions at the same time to help create talking points around different e-Safety scenarios. At the end of each quiz, depending on how many question have been answered correctly, you are rewarded with a specific amount time to play a fun game together.

The app is a great way for parents/carers to get talking with their children about practical ways to be resilient and get the best out of the internet. Schools and settings may wish to highlight this app to their communities.

The app can be downloaded for free on the iTunes app store and Google Play store.


New Internet Matters Resources for Parents/Carers – ‘Protect their Curiosity’

Internet Matters has launched a campaign urging parents to put parental controls on all internet-enabled devices to protect their children from harmful content. The safety group is backed by the UK’s largest broadband providers: BT, Sky, TalkTalk and Virgin Media.

The campaign, called Protect their Curiosity, uses a series of four hard-hitting short videos to explore some of the biggest concerns around internet protection for parents/carers including gaming, searching and sexting.

Internet Matters general manager Carolyn Bunting said: “The videos might be uncomfortable viewing, but we wanted to show the reality of how a child’s innocent curiosity can turn into a distressing experience in just one click. Kids want to use the web in safety. They don’t want to be scared of what they might click on. A big step towards this lies with parents switching on every parental control available.”


‘Keep your children safe online’ from the Kent Safeguarding Children Board

Click here to download a copy.


NSPCC launches New “Share Aware” campaign

January 9, 2015 (Kent E-Safety, Safer Online Blog)

Parents’ concerns about social networking sites popular with children are revealed, as the NSPCC launches its Share Aware campaign to get families talking about socialising safely online.

An NSPCC panel of more than 500 parents from Mumsnet reviewed 48 of these sites and said all those aimed at adults and teenagers were too easy for children under 13 to sign-up to. On more than 40 per cent of the sites, the panel struggled to locate privacy, reporting and safety information. At least three quarters of parents surveyed by the NSPCC found sexual, violent, or other inappropriate content on Sickipedia, Omegle, DeviantART, and F my Life within half an hour of logging into the sites. Those aimed at younger children, like Club Penguin, Moshi Monsters, Popjam and Bearville, fared better and parents did not find any unsuitable content on them. The NSPCC also asked just under 2,000 children and young people which social networking sites they used. Talking to strangers or sexual content were the main concerns mentioned by children. But they also thought the minimum age limit for signing up to many sites should be higher, despite saying they’d used the sites when they were underage.

The NSPCC has used the reviews to create a new online guide to help inform parents about the risks of different social networking sites used by children.

Peter Wanless, CEO of the NSPCC, said:

“Children are taught from an early age that it is good to share but doing so online can be very dangerous. We must all be Share Aware. This Christmas many children will have been given a smartphone, a tablet computer, or a games console. So it’s the perfect opportunity for parents to have that important conversation with their children about who they are talking to and what they share when they socialise online. We know that children do take risks online, sometimes without realising it. And we know some parents feel confused by the internet – out of their depth, and out of control. Our Share Aware campaign gives parents straightforward, no-nonsense advice that will help them to untangle the web and feel confident talking to their children about online safety. Keeping children safe online is the biggest child protection challenge of this generation. Parents have a vital role to play but we want social networking sites to respond to parental concerns about their children’s safety and privacy. The NSPCC will continue to challenge and work with internet companies and the Government to make the internet a safer place for children.”

The NSPCC’s Share Aware campaign is aimed at parents of 8 to 12-year-old children and also features two animations to be shown on prime time TV and digital spaces. I Saw Your Willy and Lucy And The Boy are engaging films with a serious message that follow the stories of two children who share too much about themselves online. Both films contain the simple message that although children are taught that it’s good to share, this is not always the case online.

Interested parents/carers can join the debate on social media by following #ShareAware.

Anyone looking for advice about keeping children safe online, or concerned about the safety and welfare of a child, can contact the NSPCC’s 24-hour helpline on 0808 800 5000 or email help@nspcc.org.uk.

Children worried about online safety or any other problems can call the free, 24-hour helpline on 0800 1111 or get help online at www.childline.org.uk.


Be Share Aware

nspcc2-2-w640

NSPCC: LATEST E-Safety Guidance for parents and carers from the NSPCC. Click here to find out more about their “Share-Aware” campaign developed with Mumsnet.


Kent County Council


Other useful links


Surfing with security

  • Treat the online world as you would the real world: make sure you know something about what your children are doing.
  • Ask your children to show you at least some of what they do a computer, but respect their right to privacy.
  • Put the family computer in a public place.
  • Use a filtering programme to make sure your children can’t access potentially disturbing content online.
  • Treat the internet primarily as a resource. If your children use it to help each other with their homework, for example, ask how best to manage that, rather than assuming it’s a bad thing.

CEOP- https://www.ceop.police.uk/safety-centre

CEOP Button

Reporting Online Abuse

CEOP links encourage all organisations that have an online presence, where children and young people congregate, to adopt the CEOP ‘Report Abuse’ mechanism.

 

Report Abuse Button

This is not designed to replace existing reporting mechanisms, but is intended to deal with specific threats from individuals who seek to use the online environment to access young people and children for sexual purposes.

 

Benefits

By implementing the ‘report abuse’ button, children and young people on our blog and sites will be empowered to report suspicious individuals or behaviour directly to law enforcement quickly and easily.  The reports come directly to CEOP/Police intelligence centre and the team there are then in best place to analyse, assess and take appropriate action according to the perceived risk and threat to an individual child.  

 

Information and analysis of these reports can then shape the future development of services reducing the potential threat and harm to children.

 

THE CEOP Report button is freely available on our school site, just in case it is needed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Useful Videos

CEOP KS1 Film : 'Lee & Kim' Cartoon Suitable 5 yrs -- 7 yrs

Cartoon 'Lee & Kim' if you have small children from 4 -- 7 years then you should let them view this short 10 minute cartoon, which is designed to keep them safe whilst online and more importantly, this cartoon teaches them in their early years.

CEOP Primary KS2 : 'Jigsaw' Suitable for 8 yrs -- 10 yrs

This short film is called 'Jigsaw' and is suitable for KS2 Primary School children (8 -- 10 yrs), approximate running time is 8 minutes. This short film is produced by the Child Exploitation Online Protection Centre (CEOP) and is being delivered to schools all over the UK through their ThinkUknow Programme.

Top